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World Anti-Doping Agency president John Fahey has criticised the ‘profound silence from rugby league’ after interviews of Cronulla players by ASADA investigators were held back last week.

After starting their investigation in February, ASADA began interviews with Sharks players last Monday, starting with Wade Graham, but little was achieved when the lawyers for both sides reached an impasse about the line of questioning.

There’s been no response from the NRL, but it’s reported Graham could be suspended if found to have not cooperated with ASADA.

Fahey, the former NSW Premier, said the NRL’s handling of the situation had paled in comparison to AFL’s Essendon Bombers, who have been embroiled in a similar scandal.

The Bombers have released an internal investigation damning their own handling of its supplements program while players will front for ASADA interviews this week.

"I believe at the moment as a club and as an administration they've said 'we took our eye off the ball, we didn't do it right. We have to improve,''' Fahey told Sky News. "The AFL has conducted enquires and they've acknowledged they have a problem.

"What a breath of fresh air that is. From what I am seeing as a casual observer that is not happening in Sydney with rugby league. I wish I could see the same leadership in Sydney as I see in Melbourne.''

Fahey says the NRL should have explained why the interviews have been stopped.

"There's been a profound silence from rugby league in the wake of what followed,'' he said. "Information has been given to ASADA by the ACC (Australian Crime Commission) but it must make its own enquiries.

"It sought cooperation from rugby league and from what I can see from the first interview the lawyers there prevented any answers being given.

"So much so, it seems little point in ASADA continuing.

"But the information is not going to go away and it means it will drag on much longer.

"Ultimately it will come home to roost. It took more than two years of forensic information to get Lance Armstrong and he's now viewed as the greatest fraud in sport.”

Image via Getty


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Anti-doping chief slams NRL for handling of held-back Cronulla player interviews
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