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Seinfeld's Jason Alexander has tweeted an impressively erudite statement about the US constitution and gun control.


The TV star, who played George Costanza on the hit US show, used Twitlonger - a site that gives you space to say something in more than 140 characters and send it to Twitter - to express his opposition to gun ownership in the wake of the Aurora 'Batman massacre', and called for a ban on assault weapons.

Having already tweeted his opinion in short form, Alexander said he had received "hostile comments ... from gun owners and gun advocates. Despite these massacres recurring and despite the 100,000 Americans that die every year due to domestic gun violence - these people see no value to even considering some kind of control as to what kinds of weapons are put in civilian hands".

He then pointed out that "I get messages from seemingly decent and intelligent people who offer things like: @BrooklynAvi: Guns should only be banned if violent crimes committed with tomatoes means we should ban tomatoes. OR @nysportsguys1: Drunk drivers kill, should we ban fast cars?

"I'm hoping that right after they hit send, they take a deep breath and realize that those arguments are completely specious. I believe tomatoes and cars have purposes other than killing. What purpose does an AR-15 serve to a sportsman that a more standard hunting rifle does not serve?"

The massacre in Aurora, carried out at a late night screening of the new Batman movie, killed 12 people and injured 58. Suspect James Holmes is due to make his first appearance in court today. The science student is alleged to have prepared the attack for months, and assembled an arsenal of 6000 rounds of ammunition and bullet proof clothing.

All of the guns, ammunition and equipment used by Holmes had been purchased legally.

Slamming home his point about civilian ownership of assault weapons, Alexander's essay went on: "These weapons are military weapons. They belong in accountable hands, controlled hands and trained hands. They should not be in the hands of private citizens to be used against police, neighborhood intruders or people who don't agree with you. These are the weapons that maniacs acquire to wreak murder and mayhem on innocents."

Clearly passionate about the matter, he then typed an emotional paragraph in caps.

To round off, the Seinfeld star challenged gun ownership supporters, telling them: "So, sorry those of you who tell me I'm an actor, or a has-been or an idiot or a commie or a liberal and that I should shut up. You can not watch my stuff, you can unfollow and you can call me all the names you like. I may even share some of them with my global audience so everyone can get a little taste of who you are." 

So there.

Image: Getty

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